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Grad Recap: Jeff Chui

Written by Cory Healy on December 08, 2016 in Alumni, Events, Learn to Code, Students, Technology

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Jeff Chui, a February WDI alum-turned-Developer at McCann-Erickson, got to exhibit his code skills in PairPrep's Weekend Coding Showcase. He was knighted a Top Three finalist for his chess recap app: eFour.

Named after the opening move coined by world champion Bobby Fischer as 'best by test,' eFour is a nifty little app for taking your chess game from casual to the competitive level. The program helps you visualize competitive chess plays by putting a board next to a video interface where you can pull up recap and tutorial videos found on YouTube.

“I always loved chess throughout my whole life,” says Chui, “and it just so happened that the world chess championship was going on while the showcase was.”

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Chui realized that, while video recaps of chess games are useful on their own, it might be difficult to reinforce complex sequences and the way the pros think steps ahead without some sort of visual aid. Learning by doing has long been a great way to ingrain skills; in this case, learning by doing can make it easier to conceptualize the game's wealth of strategy and, in turn, make you a better chess player! eFour also comes with the nifty ability to save move sequences for further analysis.

Chui explains: “I would watch a lot of analysis videos of the games, but I also wanted to do my own analysis as well, and that required me to either pull out a chess set or bite the bullet and try to visualize my analysis in my head. I took the hackathon as an opportunity to make a project that I could immediately use, which was to have a virtual chessboard next to any chess video I wanted. There I could explore whatever chess rabbit hole I wanted to dive into.”

In PairPrep's Weekend Coding Showcase, 10 people were selected to complete a challenge to highlight their coding skills. Of those 10, five completed their individual challenges and were paid $150 each. Projects were required to be something that people could play with, not just code. You can sign up for the next showcase here.

Interested in Web Development Intensive or any of our other courses? Stop by one of our upcoming Open Houses to learn more about the NYCDA community!

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